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Looking for comments on Babies and Kids on a bike.

babies on a bike
How do you get your Kid on a bike?

Looking to get some personal opinions about putting kids and babies on bicycles. Please post comments here on equipment that has and hasn’t worked for you. Looking for information on rear seats vs front seats, bike trailers, tag-alongs, special bikes and helmets. Would welcome opinions on bike stores that were helpful in the New York area and online sites as well. Ages can range from 1 to older children.

I plan to take this information and create a definitive guide on kids and babies on bicycles. I strongly welcome all of your suggestions.

Thank you.

6 comments to Looking for comments on Babies and Kids on a bike.

  • The bottom right photo is so dangerous looking…

  • PeteT

    Good pictures !
    I tried most of the ‘seat attached to bike’ methods as our 2 children were growing up. By FAR the best is with the child IN FRONT, where you can see and interact with them, see their reactions to all the new stuff they see and feel 100% protective of them (between your arms as in lower centre picture). I used, but did not like the rear seats as you just can’t see the child, and when they get bigger make the bike less stable.

    Once they get to age 4 they love to ride their own bikes, then the ‘tag along’ system of kids bike (or seat and back wheel), so they can get the feeling of cycling themselves.

    The front box carrier as used in Amsterdam and Copenhagen looks fun, and you can see the kids (all 3 of them !!). But a rear trailer looks less fun, as again you cant see or interact with the children as much.

    I’d strongly recommend the front seats (between your arms), for 6 to 36months, and then the ‘add on’ seat on cross bar / top tube for until they can ride or tag along. .. Pete, father of 2 (they grow up F A S T !!)

  • Our little one just turned one last week, and has been on a bike for a few weeks now. We just picked up a Topeak seat off of Craigslist (super cheap), and she has an infant helmet that we picked up from Toga. The helmet is an issue at first (she hates it) but once we start cruising she screams with delight. So far I’m super happy with the setup but it does take a little getting used to 20 pounds on the back of your bike.

  • Hi, my name is Will and I am the owner of NYCBikes/spokes & strings in Williamsburg. More importantly I am the father of Winnie and Seamus. While Seamus is too young yet at 7 mos., Winnie has been riding with us since age 2. Please consider carefully before buying a front mount seat. There is only one front mount seat that passes CPSC regulations, and besides that they present dangers in our city – the most frequent cause of serious injury to cyclists in the city is being doored, you don’t want to use your child as a bumber. Regardless of the riding conditions handlebar mount seats encourage your steering to dive in the direction of your turn, and you have to lift your child to come out of a turn (think of riding with 35lbs in your front basket) – that is a reason why heavy panniers go in the back not the front, a more stable center of gravity. I understand the desire to interact with your child, but you can hear them better if they are behind you. There is a center mount seat that passes CPSC, the Wee Ride. It encloses children on four sides like a rear seat does (seat covers 3 sides, you cover one with rear mounts), but it’s drawback is a massively heavy bar that stays on the bike (and turns ladies’ bikes effectively into men’s bikes). To sum, I completely understand the instinct to have them in front and in reach, but go with the counter-intuitive tried and true, it is much safer.

  • Sam

    I’ve been using the Bobike front seat on a Dahon for a couple years now (second kid) and find it great! It handles very well at speed with a 30 lbs kid. Unless I want to do something like a mamachari, I’ll always prefer to keep them in front (safely between my arms).

    Came across a picture a few years back of a bike with a rear child seat that had been rear ended by a car. Luckily there was no kid on the bike at the time because it was not a pretty result. If you are looking for a steel shroud for the kid in transit then a bike is not the way to go. No bike seat is safe because cars aren’t safe.

    Ride smart, take your time and never let your guard down. Kid or no kid, it’s the only way to get home every time.

  • I did not see any mention of balance bikes. Of course these are primarily for children ages 2-5, so they do leave out the littlest of children.

    I have had a lot of enjoyment out of seeing my 3-year old ride his balance bike. The bike has been very instrumental in teaching my child balance, coordination and self esteem.

    I am the owner of http://www.balancebikeshop.com and encourage you to stop by.