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New Book: Heels on Wheels, for the Ladies

There’s a new book out there encouraging woman to hit the pedals:

Katie Daily’s-Heels on Wheels, a Ladies Guide to Owning and Riding a Bike.

Here is a write up in the New York Times:

Riding Like Susan B. Anthony
‘Heels on Wheels’ — Books of Style

20121011-172804.jpgElizabeth Lippman for The New York Times
A new book encourages women to bike to work, and offers other advice (don’t wear lip gloss)


By: Liesl Schillnger
Published: October 10, 2012

“Heels on Wheels: A Lady’s Guide to Owning and Riding a Bike.” By Katie Dailey. 96 pp. Hardie Grant. $14.95.

ARE you in the mood for a contentious debate? Stroll past the North Pavilion of Union Square in Manhattan before 7 p.m. on the last Friday of each month and ask any of the hundreds of cyclists who gather there for the Critical Mass ride why women’s bikes tend to have a low crossbar (also called a “mixte” or “step-through”), whereas men’s bikes have a high crossbar that juts from below the seat to below the handlebars.

20121011-180600.jpg

Is the feature a quaint leftover from the days when women wore petticoats, and maneuvering themselves over the high bar would have been a challenge? Might it reflect a surprising impulse toward modesty among modern women who don’t mind weaving among taxis and buses, but still prefer not to bestride their steel (or carbon fiber) steeds like a cowboy hopping on a palomino? Or is the step-through an anachronism in these days of unisex denim and leggings?

Why do male and female riders require different kinds of bikes? The answers you get will be vociferous. They will not be unanimous.

With her charming book, fetchingly illustrated by Clare Owen, the British velophile Katie Dailey skirts the controversy by mildly pointing out that, however it came about, the lower bar is easier to clamber over than the higher one.

Read more: here.

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