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Cranksgiving 2013 Round Up

Cranksgiving fever has spread across the country, even as far South as Puerto Rico.
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Photo from @luispr199 from Instagram.

A video from Puerto Rico’s event:

The idea behind this event is to hold an alleycat messenger style race in live traffic and add an element to the checkpoints besides just having a manifest signed. Riders have to acquire food from grocery stores and delis, types of items that make up a traditional Thanksgiving meal. Those who complete all the checkpoints and gather all the food wins. This is really an “everybody Wins” event because all the food is donated to local charities for the hungry. It also makes for a less competitive race which encourages riders of all ages and skill levels and maybe gives participants an entry level of an alleycat race.

Races have already been held in Seattle: (November 23rd, 2013)
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From Seattle Bikeblog:
126 Cranksgiving riders haul 1,443 lbs of food to Rainier Valley Food Bank

By: Tom Fucoloro
November 23, 2013

2013 was the year that Cranksgiving broke. Seattle’s Fourth Cranksgiving exploded in size, with a stunning 126 people biking to grocery stores and food stands all across the city, buying food for Rainier Valley Food Bank.

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Read more: here.

And Santa Cruz:
20131126-095634.jpg photo from Richard Madoner @cyclelicious.

Start of Santa Cruz race:

And Portland, Oregon. (
From bikeportland.org:
Portlanders Raise $1,500 For Charity With Cranksgiving Bike Ride.
By: Michael Andersen
November 25th, 2013

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Organizers Tom McTighe and Laura Recker with the afternoon’s haul.
(Photos by M.Andersen/BikePortland)

In an event organizers said might be the first of a new tradition of charity-oriented bike fun in Portland, 96 cheerful people pedaled across the city Saturday to gather an assigned list of goods from the city’s grocery stores and co-ops.

The alleycat-inspired game, which was part of a 14-year-old American tradition called Cranksgiving, brought in $1,573 worth of dry goods for Outside In, a local nonprofit that helps homeless young people and other marginalized Portlanders.

Read more: here.

Saint Louis, MO: (November 3rd, 2013) Website.

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Los Angeles representing: (November 20th, 2013)
Cranksgiving 2010 Flyer

In Chicago: (November 23rd, 2013)
From the Chicago Reader: On the scene at Cranksgiving Chicago, the annual “food drive on two wheels”

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NYC’s was held last Saturday (November 23rd, 2013) and hosted by the prolific bike organizer, Ken Stanek.

20131126-130327.jpg photo by: Sara Kinney on Flickr.
305 riders came out and raised food and money for neighborhood food pantries and hunger fighting organizations in NYC: City Harvest, NY Foundling and Nazareth House. These are very active organizations looking for more donations and volunteers especially through the holidays. You can also follow along the action on twitter using the search hashtag #feedourpeople.

A little news style video from Averi Harper:

cranksgiving from Averi Harper on Vimeo.

Some events still to come such as San Francisco which calls it’s event the Super Market Street Sweep happening December 7th.
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More info: supermarketstreetsweep.blogspot.com

and going worldwide with Budapest, Hungary (get it Hungary-food drive…) December 14th.

Facebook event page.

Track or Die Winter Alleycat-December 14th

Get ready for the Track or Die Winter Alleycat Race. Saturday-December 14th, 2013
1460034_10200744898768887_1933260406_n(Artwork by Hector Martinez @FlipTheScriptTV

From Track or Die:

How well do you know NYC? The Winter Alley cat is TrackOrDieNYC’s largest and most difficult alley cat of the year. 8 check points throughout NYC. Registration begins at 1pm at the Naumberg Bandshell-Central Park (same location as the 2012 winter alley cat), race starts at 2pm. $5 to race, numbered spoke cards will be handed out at the FINISH LINE. Prizes awarded to top 5 riders, 1st female, 1st Santa and DFL. Fixed gear/Single speed ONLY!!! Helmets are strongly suggested. After Party location TBA. Time to start studying NYC.

More great artwork courtesy of: Cordell Murray @BlankExperiment
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Here is a video from last year’s race:

Unbreakable, A Benefit Race for Krys Blakemore, Saturday, December 7th

Besides being a super talented artist and kick ass bike mechanic, Krys Blakemore is also an all around nice person. In March of 2012, this experienced cyclist had a crash with car on Atlantic Ave in Brooklyn and was seriously injured. This event was a sad reminder that this could have easily been any one of us in the cycling community of NYC. This Saturday she is hosting a benefit race to raise money for medical costs connected with her crash and recovery.

Here is more info from her facebook event page:
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As riders we have to stick together. Sure, in a city like New York that’s easier said than done. But in the end we’re all one huge family, albeit a sometimes dysfunctional one.

As a family, we look out for our own. Now, one of our own needs our help. On March 15, 2012, Krys Blakemore was struck by a car on Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn. The accident left her with serious injuries in her right leg, and four operations later, a serious medical bill.

Now is the time for riders all over New York City to come together to show we care. Unbreakable: A Race To Benefit Krys Blakemore is an effort organized by the Do Good Crew to help alleviate some of the costs related to Krys’ injuries.

Do Good Crew will hold an alleycat race on December 7, to not only show show support and solidarity for Krys, but to also come together as a family and enjoy a great event together. There will be prizes for first, second, and third place, as well as first female rider to make it to the finish line. Registration will be $5.00, with all proceeds going towards Krys’ medical expenses. The event will be full of good people, good vibes, good times (and some holiday cheer thrown in for good measure).

MUST WEAR HELMET! – You don’t wear a helmet, you don’t race. No exceptions.

*NOTE-Rain will push event to Sunday, December 8th. Use the Facebook event page for further updates.

If you can’t make the event and want to donate to Krys, check: http://www.gofundme.com/Krysblakemore

TA and WeBikeNYC Lecture on Working With Local Government to Achieve Bike Goals

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Want to get more involved in making NYC a better place for biking? Join WeBikeNYC and Transportation Alternatives for a free lecture on working with local government at TA headquarters, 127 W 26th St. (between 6th and 7th Ave.) Manhattan. 6:30pm Wednesday, November 20th, 2013

Here is more:

Want to see more bike lanes, slow zones and bike parking? Want to see that pothole fixed or attitude change? Want to have your voice heard in your community? Attend this workshop to find out how!

We will look into the mechanics of NYC government, from community boards to the Mayor’s office, to shine a light on how to get involved. Meet like-minded bike advocates, and get the basic know-how on how to make some serious noise. Beer provided by Brooklyn Brewery!

Transportation Alternatives is New York City’s leading transportation advocacy organization. Jill Guidera, Field Organizing Coordinator, works with New Yorkers across the five boroughs to make their neighborhoods safer and restore a vibrant culture of street life.

More info: here.

Bike Talk Radio-Tonight 8pm-9pm

Tonight I’ll be on the Bike Talk NYC radio show with Keegan and Nadette.

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We’ll be talking about the book I co-authored, Bike NYC, with photographer Ed Glazar and award winning author Marci Blackman. We’ll also be talking about how it’s NOT ok to Kill cyclists or pedestrians in the wake of recent tragedies.

Tune In online to the Radio Hive Collective, www.radiohive.org from 8pm-9pm

11/19/13.

Is it OK to Kill Cyclists? How About Pedistrians? People Continue to Die and We’re Left Asking Why?

Since the publishing of the “Is it Ok to Kill Cyclists?” op-ed in the Sunday NY times (11/9/13) by Daniel Duane, there has been a number of responses as the article has made the rounds through bicycle blogs and other related publications.

The main point of Duane’s piece, although not entirely clear (at least not to this blogger) was to illustrate how drivers rarely face criminal charges after hitting and killing cyclists, even when the motorist is at fault. The opinion gave some vague examples but didn’t do a good job of finding details about why motorists aren’t prosecuted or if cyclist fatalities are even investigated.

In fairness to the author, Daniel Duane did appear on a radio program to clarify his position and continue to champion the cause that drivers seem to be getting away with murder.

Here and Now on WBUR.org
Does The Law Go Too Easy On Drivers Who Kill Cyclists?

There was also a well done NPR piece over the weekend that brought up a discussion about whether the bikes should be treated like cars in regards to current traffic laws and how cities are designed, especially with the rise in the popularity of bike sharing programs.

WNYC-Gabfest, aired November 15th, 2013

The Pedaling Revolution Edition -Episode #65

On this week’s episode of Gabfest Radio, Political Gabfest panelists Emily Bazelon, John Dickerson, and David Plotz discuss what happens if healthcare.gov doesn’t work by Nov. 30, and whether bikes should be treated like cars.

The radio program used Duane’s piece as an example that it’s NOT, OK to kill cyclists while citing the opposite side of the coin, People who apparently think it’s perfectly fine (to kill cyclists) and uses the old argument that we deserve it because of our blatant violation of traffic laws. (laws designed for motor vehicles) Case in point, Christopher Caldwell from the Weekly Standard.

Drivers Get Rolled
Bicyclists are making unreasonable claims to the road—and winning
November 18th, 2013

Cyclists like the ones in New Hampshire, whose reckless riding and self-righteousness have earned rolled eyes nationwide and the nickname of “Lycra louts” in England, have tested the public’s willingness for compromise. As bicyclists become an ever more powerful lobby, ever more confident in the good they are doing for the environment and public health, they are discovering—to their sincere surprise—that they are provoking mistrust and even hostility among the public.

Read more: here.

Mostly this op-ed is an excuse to continue the defensive gross generalization of cyclists being mostly rich middle age liberals who are not blue collar enough. Caldwell venomously spews:

“They are, to judge from their blogs, more aggrieved by delivery trucks parked in bike lanes than drivers are by delivery trucks parked in car lanes. This may be because proportionately fewer of them have ever met a person who drives a delivery truck.”

He does make a few points that roadways are outdated and don’t include the physical space for bicycles. Also, there are some valid points that biking is healthy for both people and the planet, but most cyclists are just too self righteous and think they own the roadways so therefore it’s Ok to run a few over.

Somehow it seems that if you choose to ride a bicycle as a form of transportation, you’re somehow expected to act like cars and be their equal, but if your hit by one, then your treated like less than equal. In an attempt to reclaim a sense of humanity, that actual lives have been lost, letters to the editor of the NY Times evoke similarities to pedestrians.

In direct response to the Daniel Duane piece…
From the Opinion pages of the NY TIMES

Caution: Danger in the Traffic Lanes
By: David Berman
November 10th, 2013

No, it is not O.K. to kill cyclists with impunity, but neither is it O.K. to kill pedestrians, which happens a couple of hundred times a year in New York City. The problem is not a cultural predisposition against bicyclists; it is that nobody obeys traffic laws anymore, and that’s at least partly because nobody is enforcing them.

Read more opinions: here.

The Duane piece hit especially hard in NYC due the fact that there have been a number of pedestrians killed in the last month, many of which are children 12 and under.

Continue reading Is it OK to Kill Cyclists? How About Pedistrians? People Continue to Die and We’re Left Asking Why?

Pony Up 6(66) Boston, 12/7/13

Take a trip to Beantown:

Pony Up 6-6-6

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More info: www.bostonhatesus.com

Bike Kill 10-A Look at the Bikes

Bike Kill is an amazing event of mutant bicycle mayhem put on every year by the NYC chapter of the Black Label Bicycle Club. Besides the spectacle of bizarre welded bicycle contraptions that seem to defy logic, the best part about this event is that the tall bikes and choppers are left out and encouraged for the community to try them and enjoy the thrill of both bike and sport.

Often the contraptions themselves are works of art compounded with the fact that they are kinetic. Sometimes the design of the bikes themselves gets overlooked as the rituals of riding while drinking a six pack duct taped together or crashing into huge plastic barrels of a form of bowling, takes over.

One photographer, Joshua P. Kristal, did a great job of documenting a lot of the bikes at this year’s tenth anniversary of Bike Kill 2013:

From his blog:
machupicchuthis.wordpress.com

“TAKE a dash of “Mad Max,” add a pinch of “Jackass,” sprinkle both over a wet batter of art students, bicycle messengers, anarchist welders and militant anti-globalist vegans, then let the mixture bake for, say, a decade in the oven of Brooklyn, and the resulting dish should taste a little like the Black Label Bike Club.” from the New York Times article of 2001.

Tall Bike 2

This club hosts an annual event called “Bike Kill” and its simply nuts. ”The annual Black Label event called Bike Kill, which one member, a disc jockey known professionally as D. J. Dirtyfinger, described as “a full day of freedom, via mayhem, on the street.” With jousting competitions and displays of bicycle finery, Bike Kill is a “pure celebration of being creative with bikes and on bikes,” he said, adding, “It can’t really be explained — you have to be there.” from the same NYT story.

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Photo by http://www.joshuakristal.com/ at Bike Kill 10
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Read more: here.

Cargo Bike Collective Fundraiser-11/17/13

Help support the cargo bikes collective:

Saturday, 11/17/13

7:00pm

Come test ride the cargo bike of your dreams! Help us replace cars in NYC!

Meet us at 4pm at Grand Army Plaza for a bike ride deep with our big bikes. Or, just come straight to the party at the Koz Kollective-268 Kosciusko St. after 7pm. There will be free food and cheap drinks. and maybe even a special performance by Bread and Puppet theater in the beautiful backyard. Dance party until late, as always.

We will be raffling off some goodies from our clients plus baked goods, services and more.

$uggested Donation$

Tweet for more details to: @cbcdelivers or @replacecarsNYC

Facebook: Facebook.com/groups/NYCcargobikescollective

All-City at the Philly Bike Expo

All-City Bicycles, started by Jeff Frane out of Minneapolis, makes really great bikes for urban commuting.

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Jeff: “My goals with All-City are to make things that people who love bikes want to own, and to help steer the industry in ways that positively serve the riders and shops.”

Jeff recently attended the Philly Bike Expo (11/9 & 11/10/13) and wrote up a little report on the All-City Blog:
Philadelphia Bike Expo

Jeff escaped to Austin just as I’ve returned from the Birthplace of America, the City of Brotherly Love. You know, that place from Rocky. Philadelphia.

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I wasn’t able to smuggle a bike along for this one, but don’t you worry, I was still able to track down some shenanigans. Friday night, Bicycle Revolution’s and Knog hosted a down and dirty night ride about town. If there’s one thing I know about night rides, it’s that they’re bound to end up under a bridge somewhere. I headed down with the beverage crew and helped make sure everyone was properly hydrated.

Read more from their blog: here.