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Some events I missed…

First off,
Man, have I gotten behind.

First off here is a follow up to the Tracklocross 2 that took place April 11th.

My follow up questions to the organizers:

How was tracklocross 2? What was the weather like?
It was amazing! It rained all morning, which may have scared some racers away, but by the time the race started, the skies were clear, the course was extremely muddy, and the people who did show up were full of piss and vinegar.

Who showed up?
A wide range of riders – alleycat racers, track racers, cyclocross racers, road racers. Seasoned veterans and “this is my first race” types. People from Boston, Connecticut, Philadelphia, DC, Chicago came… all over. Sludgement Day and Tracklocross-style races are definitely catching on in a cool way.

Who won?
Dave Trimble won for the second year in a row. He’s the guy who organizes the Red Hook Criterium, and who kicks ass in mountain bike and road races all over. Second place was Joe R from Philly (in his first unsanctioned race), and Joshua from Boston came in third. Crihs took fourth, Austin took fifth. For the women, Kelsey Crew was first overall. Brantley Archer took first track-legal bike, and Amanda Asteriod took first track-legal bike for the women.

Did the turnout surprise you?
We had forty-five riders show up despite the weather. I know that a lot of people stayed home because of the heavy rain in the morning and most of the afternoon, but I was pleasantly surprised at the number of people who weren’t deterred and who were still ready to come out and take on the mud and swamps of Randall’s Island.

Any stories of people getting facedown in the Mud?
Absolutely. It’s nearly impossible to avoid it during this race. But plenty of people also hit the deck on pavement. Trimble slid out on the first lap going over the Marsh Bridge, and Evan hit a bollard at full speed and nearly destroyed his frame. Corey finished the race the muddiest out of everybody.

Getting lost?
Yup. One of the hallmarks of Randall’s Island Tracklocross is that the layout and format is very challenging. Some folks from New Haven got severely lost and confused on their first lap, and it took them forever, but they put their heads down and motored through the rest of the race.

What was different about this year?
We had a whole new set of checkpoints, but they still inscribed a counter-clockwise loop around the island, like last year. Most of the checkpoints were new, using new mud fields that have been created during the construction over the past year.

What kind of bikes came out to race?
We had it all. Road bikes, ‘cross bikes with slick tires, fixed-gear commuters – some with knobby tires, some without. Dave, the winner, was riding a Pista Concept with a steel MTB fork and knobby tires. A few people were riding dedicated fixed-gear ‘cross bikes. Corey was riding a fixed gear mountain bike with a super-low gearing.

What did you learn from this event and what would you do differently next time?
There’s always room for more courses, more checkpoints, and stranger routes around and through the island… Sludgement Day III is going to be bigger, badder, and muddier!

Anything you want to add?

Thanks.

To take a bit of media from John Prolly

Video from Dom

Some great photos from Doug D who runs the blog: hardcourtbikepolo.com
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Check out his flickr set of the event.
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April 18th was the Time’s Up, James Brown Bike Ride and Dance Party.

Stephen Arthur sent this report:
About 40 skaters and bikers departed Union Square South criss crossing the East Village with spontaneous dances breaking out at the Astor cube and at various other times in the street at red lights on the way to Reverend Billy’s HQ on a warm spring evening. Many by standers, including motorists, not involved in the ride joined in by dancing, clapping, and singing along, digging a great James Brown mix coming from the new sound bike. Arriving at the HQ, as the party was already underway, we were greeted by Reverend Billy himself and a large contingent of his supporters. Dancing in the street, on the sidewalk, and in the HQ continued. As the good vibes built up throughout the evening, Reverend Billy came to the podium and to a packed audience articulated his vision to rebuild NYC community, in the shadow of the current economic crisis. See www.voterevbilly.org for details on Reverend Billy for Mayor and his platform. Many donations to his campaign were made on the spot and, the whole night, many connections were made amongst his supporters, as the party continued late into the evening. After I left the party returning the sound bike to the XUP space, with many NYers still on the street the instant response to the O’Jays “Love Train” summed up the evening as hope takes another step forward and the rest of the city starts to hear Reverend Billy’s message!

Some pictures:

Getting down at the Astor Place Cube.
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Getting down on the ride.
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Dancing on the ride.
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The new Reverend Billy Headquarters.
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NACCC 09 Boston website is up.

The North American Cycle Courier Championship website is up.

BOSTON 7/31/09

check it out NACCC09 Boston
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Registration is ON!

Video about Macaframa Premiere in Austin

Check out the Macaframa premiere in Austin, TX.
at Fast Folks, single speed and fixed gear bike shop.

Shout out to the newest biker.

This Guy,
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JC Ramirez, otherwise known as Diablo of Cycle Hawk Couriers and the photo blog CallejeroNYC, recently had one of these guys:
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Congratulations!!

Saul Ramirez, born April 12th at 5:06pm. 7.6lbs. Named after Carlos’s brother who died last May, 2008.

Happy Weekend everyone…How was your Critical Mass?

Hey give a shout out, how was your Critical Mass…all over the world.

Send photos, a comment…lemme know.

Today is Critical Mass-looking at Cleveland

NYC, Union Square North, 7:00pm

Just to show off some other city of the 400 where Critical Mass takes place:

Today we look at Critical Mass, Cleveland, OH.

I found this facebook group.

and this ecco friendly website:
Green City Blue Lake

Tous a Velo.

Love the animation

Tous à vélo ! from Jeff BARRE on Vimeo.

saw this on tracko

Kissena open this weekend-Affinity Shop Ride.

So much going on.
and it’s not even bike month yet.
Our favorite (and only) velodrome is opening up this weekend in Kissena Queens.
Affinity Cycles in Brooklyn, is leading rides out to the track this weekend.
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Time Out NYC, is going to the bikes!!

This week’s Time Out NY magazine has this pull out guide to biking.
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I don’t think this is available online. There are some good tips to rides in all 5 boroughs with good stops for food. Lots of Maps too and suggested routes.

Big Ups to my pals at NYC Velo.

Time Out has been doing this series on famous bike people and their favorite routes in their “Own the City” section. That’s right, we bikers, own this city.
Online there are PDF’s to download with maps.

So far they have had:
Brooklyn, Gabriel Willow of the NYC Audubon.
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a bike ride for bird watchers. Gabriel leads bike bird watching tours.

Queens: Pasqualina Azzarello, of recycle-a-bicycle.
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The ride is Artsy Queens, with stops at cool art spots.

The Bronx: Mel Rodriguez, of Safestreetsincoop.org

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This is a Bronx history tour.

Staten Island with Nadette StaÅ¡a, a volunteer with Time’s Up.

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This is a mellow Zen ride of Staten Island.

And next week…

Yours Truly.
Michael Green’s ride Manhattan like a messenger without being one.
Thanks to Time Out for the Plug.

Brooklyn’s Courier Company gets Press

Hugo and Colin from Brooklyn’s newest courier company, Snap Delivery,
got a nice story in the Daily News.

*Apr 04 - 00:05*
photo by Siegel/News

Shoestring approach has some messengers pedaling to success
by Alex J. Berkman
Monday, April 20th 2009, 1:19 PM

They weave nimbly through traffic, don’t use even a drop of gasoline and can promise speedy delivery, so it’s no wonder bike messengers are in high demand.

Once relegated to rushing documents around the canyons of Wall Street, street pedalers now get paid for deliveries as diverse as cases of wine and DVDs. And since the business essentials are mainly a reliable bicycle, a waterproof bag and a strong dose of fearlessness, many messengers are breaking free from the fleet and working for themselves.

“The only one that makes money is the independent,” said Hugo Giron, co-owner and founder of Snap Delivery of Brooklyn.

Read the rest of the article Here.